215-568-6222
Philadelphia Dentistry
Dr. Ken Cirka & Dr. Jessica Meier
free
first visit: a $170 value!

contact us for an immediate response

no links allowed

Philly Dentistry

June 27, 2017
4 weeks ago

Tired of avoiding foods and beverages you like simply because of the temperature?  Read on to learn about 6 of the reasons your teeth may be sensitive to hot or cold, which is the first step to remedy!

Cavities

If there are cavities growing inside of your teeth it can cause them to be sensitive. Often the temperature sensitivity is an indication that the bacteria have reached the nerve inside of the tooth which could mean that the tooth requires a root canal.shutterstock_215205235

Gum Infection

There is bacteria in everyone’s mouths that can lead to a gum infection in the mouth. This is why it is important to see your dentist and dental hygienist every 6 months so that the bacteria you cannot reach can be cleaned out which prevents the gum infection. Sometimes this bacteria will cause an abscess which might be sensitive to temperature.

Clenching and Grinding

Many patients clench and grind their teeth while they are asleep. This condition, bruxism, is not always something you are aware of. If you are clenching or grinding your teeth there will be indications in the mouth your dentist will be able to diagnose if it is happening. When you clench and grind your teeth it introduces stress fractures into the teeth that are sensitive to hot and to cold temperatures.

Erosion from Acidic Foods

When your diet consists of acidic drinks and acidic foods it can lead to the enamel eroding. The enamel layer of the teeth is built to protect from sensitivity therefore if it is eroded the teeth can become sensitive to hot and cold.

Cracked Tooth o67d2298ad1f995506d8918db5f6da942r Filling

If you have a tooth or filling that is cracked it can definitely cause sensitivity to hot and cold. Usually the sensitivity is most noticeable when the crack extends into the nerve of the tooth.

Gum Recession

If you have gum recession this means that the roots of your teeth are exposed. The roots do not have any enamel to protect from hot and cold sensitivity so temperature changes can affect them. Gum recession can happen from previous history of orthodontics or gum disease.

If you are concerned because of hot or cold sensitivity, call us so we can help you. Dr. Cirka and Dr. Meier can do a free consultation to evaluate your teeth and gums and see why the sensitivity is happening. Call us today at 215-568-6222. We look forward to hearing from you!

June 13, 2017
1 month ago

Patients will often ask Dr. Meier and Dr. Cirka, “Is chocolate bad for my teeth?” This question pops up even more often around the holiday seasons. Patients are many times surprised by the positive effects that chocolate will have on our health in general and the fact that it actually is a much better option for a sweet than sticky candies or sugary drinks.

There are a lot of positives effects of chocolate on your health overall, especially whenhappy-woman-taking-bite-of-chocolate-bar_y4f5qu considering how eating chocolate releases endorphins. Endorphins are hormones specifically designed to help us feel good. Endorphins are released in times we are happy and doing things like exercising or eating things we enjoy.

Similar to the old adage, “everything in moderation,” chocolate is fine for the teeth and the body in general when eaten in moderation. A study released in May 2016, the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study, found that eating chocolate on a daily basis is proven to improve brain cognition. The research showed that over a period of eighteen years with close to one thousand participants, the group that ate chocolate daily had higher test scores than participants who did not.

Which chocolate is the best for my teeth… milk, white, or dark?

When considering which type of chocolate is best for your teeth the answer is simple. Dark chocolate is by far the better option. When we look at the sugar content of the three main types of chocolate, on average white chocolate has 17 grams per ounce, milk chocolate has 15 grams little baby eat cakeper ounce, and dark chocolate has 14 grams per ounce. While these numbers may not seem very different, as time goes by it adds up and the more sugar you have the more at risk you are for cavities and dental problems.

 

When you look into what the ingredients are for different types of chocolate you will find that milk chocolate and white chocolate both have more sugar, powdered milk, and harmful ingredients than dark chocolate. What’s more is that dark chocolate comes in different ways and the more raw and organic it is, the better it will be for your teeth and your health.

Believe it or not, some studies show dark chocolate to be a fighter against cavities. There is a compound in dark chocolate called a polyphenol. This compound has been shown to fight bacteria in the mouth by preventing sugars from turning into acids. This stops the process of the enamel breaking down the teeth which leads to cavities.

Dark chocolate also contains another compound known as a flavonoid. These flavonoidsgetty-519516157-woman-eating-chocolate-jose-luis-pelaez-inc are proven to slow down the process of tooth decay.

Antioxidants are also built into each piece of dark chocolate. These antioxidants are great for overall health in addition to oral health. They have been proven to help fight gum disease, a condition than causes people to lose their teeth..

Keep in mind that tooth decay does not happen overnight. Problems with cavities build cumulatively and it is important to cut down on sugar intake overall, make sure to brush and floss daily, and see the dentist regularly for check-ups and cleanings.

Enjoy the dark chocolate and remember to keep moderation in mind. Call us at 215-568-6222 to schedule your free consultation with Dr. Cirka and Dr. Meier.  We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Try us out at no risk by scheduling your FREE first visit! 215-568-6222

or contact us today for a free consultation with Dr. Cirka or Dr. Meier in our Center City, Philadelphia office.

all-staff

contact us today

use this quick form

no links allowed
Website developed by Website Optimization